Archive for 'Las Vegas'

Las Vegas Then and Now

Las Vegas Then and Now

Twelve different time-machine morphs are presented in which iconic Vegas landmarks are seen both “then” and “now.”

Morelli House

Morelli House

The historic Antonio and Helen Morelli house is preserved by the Junior League of Las Vegas. It was built in 1959 as the home of the long-time orchestra director at the Sands Hotel, Anthony (Antonio) Morelli.

Old Mormon Fort, Las Vegas

Old Mormon Fort, Las Vegas

Arriving from Utah in 1855, 30 Mormon missionaries built an adobe fort here as the first permanent structure erected in the Las Vegas valley.

Goldstrike Canyon Hot Springs

Goldstrike Canyon Hot Springs

Within the Lake Mead Recreation Area, Goldstrike Canyon and its hot springs may be reached by foot or by boat.

Red Rock Canyon

Red Rock Canyon

Travel 17 miles west of the neon canyons of Las Vegas and you’ll find the red sandstone formations of the Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area. Visited by more than a million people each year, this 195,819 acre area is controlled by the Bureau of Land Management.

Pictograph Ledge

Pictograph Ledge

The rock art sites in the area surrounding the Las Vegas Valley were located along prehistoric game trails leading to water holes, near hunting blinds, or in narrow gorges where game could be ambushed. This rare site may have involved rituals, centered on pictograph-making in association with seasonal food-gathering.

Fremont Street Experience

Fremont Street Experience

Downtown Las Vegas’ Fremont Street Experience offers hourly light shows each evening, with more than 12 million LED modules and a half-million watt sound system.

Hoover Dam

Hoover Dam

From the transformer platform below Hoover Dam its imposing 726 foot height, the highest in the country, is evident. The structure extends 1,244 feet across Black Canyon and is 660-feet thick at its base.

Bellagio Las Vegas

Bellagio Las Vegas

For the lobby of the Bellagio on the Vegas strip, artist Dale Chihuly in 1998 crafted the “Fiori di Como,” a ceiling installation made of 2,000 hand-blown glass pieces.

Neon Boneyard

Neon Boneyard

Las Vegas casinos have donated many of their signature Las Vegas signs to the Neon Museum for its outdoor gallery of restored neon at the intersection of Las Vegas Blvd. and Fremont St. The museum’s “Neon Boneyard” is a nearby three-acre site enclosing more than 150 historic, non-restored signs.


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